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either because they are frustrated or because they want to get more training or education. some people are finding jobs. economists have looked at different calculations of which is the better factor -- the bigger factor, or people dropping out or getting more education and training and my understanding is that there are equal roles being played by each for spirit -- each force. but there are definitely some dropping out. some of that is the baby boom generation starting to retire. it may not be a "dropping out," but people choosing to retire and leave their jobs. some older people may have lost their jobs and cannot find new ones and are taking early social security benefits. there is some of that. host: mr. r doane, the labor force participation -- mr. nardone, a labor force position rick, please explain this. guest: the take the people who are employed in those who are unemployed and combine them and you get what is called the labour force. divide that by the population in at 16 and over and you're of the force participation rate. is the proportion of the population that is either e
to succeed and i want our school to be giving our kids the kind of education they need for the jobs of tomorrow. that means we have to put our kids first and parents first and teachers first. the teachers union will have to go behind. [cheers and applause] number 4, you will not get business people to risk their life savings to start a small business or big companies to come to america, built a big factory, hire americans if they think we are on the road to greece. if we keep spending more than we taken, that is where we're heading. we will cap federal spending and get us back on track to a balanced budget. [cheers and applause] number 5, number 5 is this -- we are going to champion small business. we're going to help small business people build their businesses. to do that, we will keep their taxes down and get regulations to encourage growth and take that big cloud of obama care of small business. we're going to help small business in america. [cheers and applause] we do those five things and 12 million jobs grow in america and take home pay starts going up again. do you realize u
class does not have its taxes go up and making sure that we invest in education and infrastructure and innovation. the alternative choice that has been presented is that we should lower taxes for millionaires and billionaires and in order to pay for that, we have to turn medicare into a voucher program. we have to get investments in education and innovation, research and development, border security, diplomatic security. that is not the right answer. that is not the right approach. we have tried it. it did not work. we should not go back. >> [inaudible] and the former regional security officer have both suggested there were efforts from the u.s. embassy in libya to have more security at the state department. state department officials would not let it happen. why? why would the state department not listen to these men on the ground in libya who wanted more security? >> as i said, there is no question that the results of what happened in benghazi is not acceptable. four americans killed is not an acceptable situation, and that is what the president moved so quickly to ensure that an
cut down talks completely on jobs and wanting to cut the education credit. the president signed the "dream act," and hundreds of thousands of students are able to get their education. i am educated. i put my son through law school. it is his birthday today on columbus day, october 8. we moved to california when i was 8 years old. my mother remarried and my stepfather was a marine at camp pendleton and coronado. host: thank you for the call. guest: everything she said, i disagree with. she did talk about lowering the cost of education for kids getting into college. that is significant. she also talked about the blue part of the state that has really struggled. over the last 30 or 35 years. it's now starting to come back with a gas and oil industry, making sure that it is safe, with the steel industry, it's starting to come back. and certainly with the automotive industry. we have to be positive about those kind of things. if we continuously be rated president and start saying government is not working, voters react to that. jay and i know that go to washington or columbus, they d
immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scholarships, they got wired. when you know this and you do not talk about it and do not do anything about it, this is another recipe for disaster. our public education system is just really got to be strained out. the teachers' unions are primarily concerned about how much they make a year, and that is not where the concern has to be. it is making sure that children have the funds in education that are needed for education. >> we spend double per person to educate k through 12, double other nations. we do the same thi
, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. this is actually about jobs and economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming
to ban a blessing. both of these are opposed not only by your running mate but just about every education in the country. now that you are mr. mondale's running mate, had to change your position on either of those? >> both mondale and i agree on the same goal, that is not discrimination. i just did not agree on the same direction he does on how to achieve it. i do not find any problem with that. that is something that has been handled by the court and not by him or congress. but we both support nondiscrimination and have seen and integration of neighborhoods as the goals we have set forth. i represented a district in queens that is 70% catholic. let me say as well i have been a supporter of public schools, education. that is something we feel very strongly about for the future of the country. this administration over the past several years has gutted the educational programs available to our young people. it has attempted to knock out pell grants, which is money to young individuals who are poor and cannot afford to go to college. it is reduced by 25% the amount of money going into colleg
overburdens in regulation and cuts spending one penny of every dollar. it focuses on education to make sure we are empowering our workforce for the jobs that are available. lastly, it develops a comprehensive energy plan so we can put people back to work while we are protecting our economy and being an energy independent. i spend time developing my plan. you have no plan. i think the people of connecticut want to know what we're going to do for them. >> mr. murphy, you have 30 seconds. >> linda mcmahon should stop spreading these stories. it's not ok to make up these stories when you're running for the senate. my work is based in the work of debt and public service and focusing tax cuts on the middle- class, not by focusing tax cuts on the affluent and rich. my focus is on rebuilding the education system, not divesting from funding the most important services to our states. they're big differences in are planted as we should be talking about. >> is the public being well served by the quality and nature of this campaign? we are here today in a formal debate and youtube are probably going to ans
. borrowing not to invest in schools, in hospitals, transport and education. but borrowing to keep people idle. so the next time you hear a conservative say to you labour would increase borrowing, just remember it is this government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we've seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. people think that's what were promised. now look there will be some people who say, and this is an important argument, they'll be some people who say, well there is short-term pain but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see that the longer you have low growth in our country the bigger the debt hole becomes for the future and the bigger our problems will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work that is not just bad for their prospects now; it is bad for their prospects for the whole of the rest of their lives. and if a small business goes under during the recession, it can't just get back up and running again during the recovery. so when david cameron says to you, well let
or insurance company. we cannot afford to cut our investments in education or clean energy or research or technology. that's not a jobs plan. does not plan to grow the economy. that is not change. that is a relapse. we have been there and we have tried that. we are not going back, we are moving for. that's why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states. -- we are moving forward. [cheers and applause] we've got a different view about how to create jobs and prosperity in america. a strong economy does not trickled down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class and folks working hard to get into the middle class. i believe it's time for our tax stops rewarding companies for shipping jobs overseas. let's reward companies in ohio that are keeping jobs in american. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards so by the middle of the next decade your cars and trucks will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decade.
, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigration policy. so we get the most energy etic and talented im-- energetic and talented immigration. fourth, we have the best rules. lastly, we have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this .
that the narrow focus on racial diversity in higher education has eclipsed larger issues of class and the quality, among colleges and universities. so, in advance of the u.s. supreme court's oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas, which will take place next week, the century foundation put together a report which i am going to outline which looks at the question, is it possible to create racial and ethnic diversity without using race, and instead paying attention to larger issues of economic equality in our society. it is called a better affirmative action. it makes three main points. the first, that racial affirmative action is likely on its way out. affirmative action based on race was always meant to be temporary by those who originally envisioned it, a deviation for a period of time away from the non-discrimination principle. but now there are both legal and political forces that appear to be bringing affirmative action to a end. to begin with, it is highly unpopular among average american voters. if you look at the supreme court briefs in the fisher case, you would think there i
, not for most people, but for those who make a million dollars or more. making the investments in education, making the investments in research, and we make those investments together and build a future. that is what it will take over the long run to build a stronger future here in western massachusetts, all across the commonwealth, and all across the country. >> thank you. mr. brown? >> thank you. before i start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, tha
on banks and insurance companies. we cannot got our investments on education, clean energy, research, technology. that is not a plan to grow the economy. that is not change. we have been there. we have tried that. we are not going back. we are moving forward. that is why i am running for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] look -- we have got a different view about how you bring jobs and prosperity to america. the strong economy does not trickle down from the top. it grows from a thriving middle- class, and folks working hard to get into the middle-class. i think it is time our tax code stopped rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas. let us reward small businesses and manufacturing here in ohio, products made in america. that is the choice in this election. i believe we can create more jobs by controlling more of our own energy. after 30 years of inaction, we raised fuel standards. by the middle of the next decade, your cars and trucks would go twice as far on a gallon of gas. today, the u.s. is less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in two decade
, jobs, education, and the federal budget deficit. on each one of the issues, i have more experience and then the governor of massachusetts. the national security and arms control, you have to understand the relationship between a ballistic missile, a warhead, what megatonnage is. the better understand about a correction. the better understand you have to negotiate from a position of strength. these are important issues because we want to have more arms control and arms deduction. i wrote the job training partnership act, a bipartisan bill to read a bill that is trained and employed over three disadvantaged youths and adults of enter this country. i have worked 80 years on the senate budget committee. i wish that the congress would give us a line item veto to help deal with that. qualifications a lot are going to be the issue in this campaign, george bush has more qualifications that george bush and michael dukakis combined. [applause] >> 11 interrupt and ask once again that the audience please keep your responses as quiet as possible. we know many of these are simply one -- for simp
for their college education and she's voted to increase taxes on the middle class through the ryan plan. all of this in order to keep tax breaks for multi-millionaires and tax breaks and subsidies for corporations who ship jobs overseas. we're going to reduce the deficits by bringing home our troops from afghanistan, by making sure that we create jobs right here in the district, by making sure that we decrease taxes on the middle class and small businesses, and by allowing medicare to negotiate drug prices with our pharmaceutical companies so that we can tackle the real problem, which is our health care costs and eliminate unnecessary procedures and redundant tests. >> all right, thank you, dr. ruiz. congresswoman, you have one minute. >> i don't think he understood the question, because what he just said, he's going to reduce the debt by not having so many medical tests, which, by the way, is a major part of obama care. obama care is what cut medicare by $716 billion on. let me tell you a few specific things i would do immediately to cut the debt. first of all, i would repeal obama care as
really good academic education but they've also really gotten spectacular education in living with the folks who are the real virginia today. we're increasingly diverse state and that's an important part of medication. -- education. i would hope what the supreme court would do in this case would be they would affirm that it is ok for a public institution, whether it's government body handing out contracts or student or college admitting students, that it's ok for them to try to make sure that their student body looks like the state looks. they should if at all practical use factors on race and economic disadvantage, are you the first in your family to go to college? but if you see public institutions where the numbers of students dramatically different then the state population, i think it's an indication of challenge and problem that we have to try to solve. i strongly believe the diversity of our commonwealth is the strength, diversity of our nation is a strength and we ought to see diversity in our public bodies. >> mr. allen? >> i'm in some agreement with tim's expressions
that can pass through metal detectors. he voted against the department of education. he voted against funding for meals on wheels for seniors. he voted against a holiday for martin luther king. he voted against a resolution calling for the release of nelson mandela in south africa. it's amazing to hear him criticizing my record or john kerry's. >> 30 seconds. >> i think his record speaks for itself. and frankly, it's not very distinguished. >> we'll move on to domestic patterns. this question i believe goes to vice president cheney. the census bureau -- >> it goes to senator edwards. >> to you. i just asked him about zeile even though we didn't talk about it much. >> i concede the point. >> no. i did talk about it. israel. he's the one who didn't talk about it. >> mr. vice president, the census bureau marks cleveland as the biggest poorest city in america. you two gentlemen did well for yourselves in the private sector. what can you tell the people of cleveland or cities like cleveland that your administration will do to better their lives? >> well, gwen, there are several things that
new jobs. we cannot slow up on education, because that's the engine that is going to give us the economic growth and competitiveness that we need. and we are not going to slow up on the whole idea of providing for affordable health care for americans, none of which, when we get to talk about health care, is as my -- as the governor characterized -- characterized. the bottom line here is that we are going to, in fact, eliminate those wasteful spending that exist in the budget right now, a number of things i don't have time, because the light is blinking, that i won't be able to mention, but one of which is the $100 billion tax dodge that, in fact, allows people to take their post office box off- shore, avoid taxes. i call that unpatriotic. i call that unpatriotic. >> governor? >> that's what i'm talking about. >> governor? >> well, the nice thing about running with john mccain is i can assure you he doesn't tell one thing to one group and then turns around and tells something else to another group, including his plans that will make this bailout plan, this rescue plan, even be
't afford to gut our investments in education. or clean energy. or research. and technology. we can't afford to roll back regulations on wall street banks or oil companies or insurance companies. that is not a jobs plan. it's not a plan to grow our economy. it's sure not a plan to strengthen our middle class. we have been there. we have tried that. we're not going back. we are moving forward. we've got a different view about how we create jobs and prosperity in this country. [applause] this country doesn't just succeed when just a few are doing well at the top. succeed is when the middle lass gets bigger. our economy doesn't grow from the top down. it grows from the middle out. we don't -- we don't believe that anybody's entitled to success in this country. but we do believe in opportunity. we believe in a country where hard work pays off. and responsibility is rewarded. and everybody's getting a fair shot. and everybody's doing their fair share. and everybody's playing by the same rules. that's the country we believe in. that's what we've been fighting for for the last four years. that's wh
gone out to four from his constituencies and then educate the electorate about how the elected representative is sideways with the american people. there is talk about how the president has a stimulus program. it was highly unpopular. the only thing the super pac can do is hold the president or any other elected official to account. it does not change the stimulus legislation. but we can identify places where an elected representative is sideways with his constituents and let people know about it. i don't think i agree with the premise of the question that it is necessarily bad. i think it brings to light a lot of what people don't know. >> i think there should be full disclosure. but if you let that flew into candidates come it would allow underfunded candidates -- if you could wave a wand and get rid of limits and allow people to essentially contribute as much as they want to the candidate as long as it is immediately disclosed, the press and opponents can decide whether that is having undue influence on the elected official. that would bring more accountability back to the c
and regards to tax policy. because an educated person, they know that the mass does not add up. host: thank you. this story from the washington post. plan would do little to lower tax rates. -- wilmington, delaware. dave on our line for democrats. caller: thank you for taking my call. a want to make two comments. first of all, in the last vice presidential debate, the moderator seem to have more control from the fact that the men were sitting at a table. and that close proximity to -- i gather that the attention to the moderator was better, versus the first debate were there was a distance between the speakers. and jim lehrer had much more trouble trying to control the debate. the second thing come on the first debate jim lehrer was asking each of the candidates to speak about the differences that they feel that they have with the other candidate. and sort of a different type of question, much more interruption. host: what you think of the choice of the four moderators? bobb and mandy coming up? >> fantastic. and i look forward to the town hall format. which gets more of the town hall and a
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
of the expenditures in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986 even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the ot
people in the audience. they like it. we viewed it as part of the educational function of the commission of presidential debates. that is what we do it on college campuses. it is amazing, there are thousands of students out there on one side or the other. they are energized. the people in this community are energized. we think is very important to have this sort of setting and we will continue this. there is much jargon about whether or not it ought to be in a studio. -- much argument about whether it ought to be in a studio. i think that is a sterile environment. the university campuses the center of learning in our country. >> we are about to begin engaging our audience on the importance of the vice- presidential debate. our question to them is, does it affect your vote? >> it is a trite expression, but it is true, that the vice president is one heartbeat from the presidency. over the last 50 years, we have had places where the vice president has had to become the president. sometimes temporarily, when we have had operations on some of the existing precedents. other times there are ass
across the board 19%, in eviscerating education and so many other things. he said, no, no, that is not a cut. he said it is a smaller increase. i want to tell that all to your parents when they don't take a $2,500 tax credit next year if they win could tell that to the two hundred thousand kids who will be kicked off of early education. on taxes and make you go back and look, paul ryan is saying his budget really is not a budget cut. that is like governor romney standing in an unemployment line and say, i did not outsource your job, i offshore it. that is the distinction they make. [applause] when i point out that governor romney, who is a great businessman, did the bain way, the lowest wages, the cheapest community that you can find, and then move there, offshore, outsourced jobs, they came back and said, no, no, that is not what he is doing. when i pointed out that the governor even, as governor of massachusetts, sent a call service that people in massachusetts could pick up the phone and see whether or not they were entitled to unemployment benefits, they got someone in
improvements in public education, safety, welfare reform, and i described how worked with leaders in the other party to get results for the people. the bad economy, his decision, his choice serving as national party chairman rather than focusing on the economic crisis in virginia. it is the great, and answer a question in this campaign. how does a governor decide to take on a second job, giving partisan speeches, well over 100,000 jobs are lost here in virginia. if he had given his governorship the full attention, he might have avoided some mistakes like increase in college tuition by over 40%. if he had been listening to the people of virginia who are really facing tough times, he might not have proposed raising taxes on working people, working women, seniors, small business owners, and people earning $17,000. he might tip been against the sequestration deal threatening jobs in virginia right now. but he made different choices. soon, you'll get to choose. if i have the honor of being your senator, i will give all my energy to working with both parties and getting america us sending once again
take race into account in fashioning their student bodies to make sure there is educational diversity. >> what is the university of system for acceptance? guest: bic most kids from the top 10 system, the top 10 percentage of schools in texas. then it is about 75% of the class. the of a 25% is admitted on the way that most universities admit, the look of the entire file, academic credentials, but all other factors, life experiences, rick and assist the city -- race and ethnicity. the last part is what abigail objects to. there is no role for the government to be sort of people by race. >> the university of texas of austin's has what? guest: they say the supreme court has endorsed education and diversity as a compelling goal for the government and an exception to the usual rule that the government should not be classified people by race. it is true, and a 5-4 decision, the supreme court said that, but the key vote, sandra day o'connor, has retired, replaced by a more conservative judge, samuel alito, so in that they give us a new result. >> what is the result of this, who will hear it,
in the tax code are not loopholes at all. tax preferences, things like a college education and retirement savings belong in the tax code even after reform happens. they were put in the code on purpose, to make a middle-class lifestyle accessible and sustainable for american families. tax reform recognized this in 1986. even as we cleared out the underbrush of loopholes, which preserved versions of the mortgage interest deduction, the charitable deduction, the state and local property tax deduction. realized that as much as we want to make the code more efficient, these provisions were two essential to middle-class households. we have to abide by the same principle today. if we seek to protect the expenditures that are most essential to the middle-class, we still hope to reduce the deficit and we will need to find alternative revenue sources. this leads to the second principle of this new model for tax reform -- the tax rate for the highest earners should probably return to clinton-era levels and stay somewhere around there. this will come as heresy to some of those on the other side who n
both of us. she is about 23 years old. she was educated at pepperdine university. she is working for "the daily caller." i want you to hear what she says from her perspective on journalism and get your reaction to it. >> i feel as though twitter and facebook have enabled people who maybe are not in the media and not have a loud voice to become one of the loudest voices in the media. we see people like matt drudge who has no connection to the media, is a political outsider, and look how far he has come. he took advantage and saw the potential of the new medium, the internet, internet journalism, and his voice is just as loud as the media establishment. >> reaction? >> appalled. i am appalled. i do not know quite what she thinks -- this is a good idea? >> she does. >> i think it is a dreadful idea. good journalism, good reporting must work in the constraints of great editing. it has to. i ran into trouble a few years ago, giving a speech at some award in canada. i was talking about so-called citizen journalism. i said i would trust it as much as i would trust the citizen survey. yo
. 70% catholic. let me say, as well, i have always been a great supporter of public school education. that is something that we feel very, very strongly about for the future of this p country. this administration over the past several years has gutted the educational programs available to our young people. it has attempted to knock owl pe will -- pell grants for individuals who are poor and cannot afford to go to college. it has reduced by 25% the amount of money going into college education, and by a third those going into secondary and primary schools. but mr. mondale and i feel strongly that if you educate your children, that's an effort and a way that you build up and make a stronger america. with reference to civil rights, i think you have to go beyond that. i think if you look at my record in the congress and fritz mondale's, we both have extremely strong civil rights records. this administration does not. it has come in, in the bob jones ' case, on the side of segregated academies. it came in on the side of discrimination against women, the handicapped, and the elderly. as a m
comprehensive school education. so, britain gave me, gave my family, a great gift that my parents never had. a safe and secure childhood. and you know my parents didn't talk much about their early lives, it was too painful, it hurt too much. the pain of those they lost. the guilt of survivors. but i believe that their experience meant they brought up both david and myself differently as a result. because having struggled for life itself, they instilled in us a sense of duty to ease the struggles of others. and this came not just from my parents' wartime experience it came from the daily fabric of our childhood. you know there were toys and games, rows about homework. i was actually a dallas fan, believe it or not, which didn't go down well with my dad as you can imagine. so of course there were the normal things, but every upbringing is special, and mine was special because of the place of politics within it. when i was twelve years old, i met a south african friend of my parents, her name was ruth first. the image i remember is of somebody vivacious, full of life, full of laughter. and the
-class has cared about. it will kick 200,000 children off of early educated. it will eliminate the tax credit people have to send children to college. it cuts education by $450 billion. it does virtually nothing except continue to increase the tax breaks to the wealthy. the idea that he is so concerned about the deficits, he voted to put two wars on a credit card. >> we're going to closing statements in a minute. >> our budget, we have not -- >> i want to talk to you very briefly before we go to closing statements about your own personal character. if he were elected, what could be both give to this country as a man, a human being, that nobody else could it? >> honesty. there are plenty of fine people that could lead this country. there are people who say when they are going to do something, they go do it. what you need is one people see problems, they offer solutions to fix the problems. we're not getting that. we can grow the economy faster, that is what our five-point plan is all about. it is about getting people out of poverty into the middle class. that is about going with proven pro-gro
. >> you think the education structure problems -- president obama's famous line about "you did not bill that." -- "you did not build that." do you think that future communication will fall under his philosophy for building for private innovation? >> when you talk about innovation, clearly the government has a role to play in these arenas to ensure fair play and competitiveness. if you look at the manner in which the railroads were built up. government investment was important. it would not have happened otherwise. it also would not have happened without the private sector. it is not an either/or situation. it is finding that balance of where the government helps and when the government needs to step back and make sure everything is regulated well, of fair play, going forward. >> gentleman, we are out of time. these issues about security and privacy -- do they move the political needle? >> i think people will -- i think the chance of people making their choice on november 6 because of obscure technology issues is increasingly small. for the obama administration or the romney campaign --
. they apply the worldwide economics of the labor market place to your value. a poorly educated semi motivated american worker is not a very valuable commodity on the world market. that is the problem. if he went the economy to improve -- if you want the economy to approve, we need to be nationalists -- global financial dominance is what is killing us. the investor class is ruining the worker class of america. host: 4 you yourself, has your idea of the american dream changed in the last couple of years? caller: i have been very fortunate. i would say it has. i am much more cynical now. there seems to be a minority of americans that believe the most important thing in the world is to get rich as soon as they can and they do not care how they do it. that is killing 80% of the american workers in this country. host: mary, where are you calling us from? caller: illinois. from what i heard from the last caller, i a greed. we cannot expect to be forever the super power most important person in the whole universe. we have to be part of the world and deal with what is out there. it is changing. host:
that bought into a university -- got into a university only got into a physical education program that the program includes all the star athletes. every star athlete in the school happens to be black or hispanic or asian or something else. they have now reached critical mass of 20% that the university in the situation cannot use race in the holistic way that grutter permits? >everyone of their students who happens to be minority will end up in the program. do you not think the university should consider it needs a different diversity? >> the factor is a choice. you have a critical mass of students. they choose to major in different things. that is the problem of classroom diversity. what are they not in the small classrooms? why does that happen? you would say that is an aberration. what is causing it? >> are facing the same thing when we are looking at the holistic measure we are looking for the student who is a nuclear scientist? >> no. it did not take into account the interests. but not as if you're going to major in physics. -- their not going to use you in major physics. they
with him. >> i do not know of any government program that john is supporting. not early education. the reason no child was left behind is the money is left behind. with regard to the role of vice president, i had a long talk, as a sure the governor did, with her principal, with a rock. i have a history of getting things done in the united states senate. -- with barack. i have a history of getting things done in united states senate, as john mccain nos. i would be the point person on getting things done. when asked if i wanted a portfolio, my response was no, but for rock obama indicated he wanted me with him to help him govern, so every decision he makes, i will be sitting with him in the room to give him advice -- but for rock -- but barack obama indicated he wanted me in the room to help him govern. i look forward to working with barack and playing a very constructive role in his presidency, bringing about the kind of change this country needs. >> from 2008, in st. louis, the vice presidential debate, robert watson, let me pick up on something we discussed earlier, which is how
to educate the public to wait -- an understanding of how the process is supposed to work and a red flag when it is not going that way. the demand has to come from both sides, i think. >> i agree, rules are incredibly important and we throw lot of effort into this but the majority can change any time. the thing that keeps the rules from changing its public expectations. that is why we did not go crazy on the 72-hours. i try not to be to me about that because it is a big shift that says we were -- we will hold ourselves to that. the one reliable thing is norms or democracy should function. i will choose clear expectant -- expectations of clear rules and a day. >> i think it is worth adding to that -- the concern that i often have is to the members know what they are voting away? there is a rule in the house that shows how the reposal would change block. are there technological reasons why the council is having difficulty showing results? there are other issues with that. the concern i have is you can get 218 people to vote for anything, even under the right circumstances, most of the time you
for our children's education. i had to look at every single tax available, a sales-tax and income-tax, you name it. that is something the lieutenant governor of the time said was our responsibility. you would not know anything about it. what you do not do is do your job as a legislator, worried problems will come along later, to try to run a campaign. >> i do not blame you. there is nothing else to suggest that. i am sorry, mr. sadler, i think you lied. i am sorry you want to attack me personally. i do not intend to reciprocate. there's a sharp policy different between the policies you have advocated and are advocating. i also think -- >> if you will stop him in a reasonable time -- >> we only have two minutes left ear. we will try to wrap up. mr. cruz, if you are successful, you will be the junior senator for texas. as i have said before, there is a chance that by then obama will be reelected any chance the democrats will maintain control of the senate. given the fact that you said earlier that you do not like to compromise, how can you be effective in that landscape? >> the premise of yo
200,000 children off of early educated. it will eliminate the tax credit people have to send children to college. it cuts education by $450 billion. it does virtually nothing accept continue to increase the tax breaks to the wealthy. the idea that he is so concerned about the deficits, he voted to put two boards on a credit card. >> we're going to closing statements in a minute. >> our budget, we have not -- >> i want to talk to you very briefly before we go to closing statements about your own personal character. if he were elected, what could be both give to this country as a man, a human being, that nobody else could it? >> honesty. there are plenty of fine people that could lead this country. there are people who say when they are going to do something, they go do it. what you need is one people see problems, they offer solutions to fix the problems. we're not getting that. we can grow the economy faster, that is what our five-point plan is all about. it is about getting people out of poverty into the middle class. that is about going with proven pro-growth policies that we know w
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